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Mugaru

XNA Studio in VS 2017

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Posted (edited)

Hi Guys, 

Since i'm working on a Map Editor for Conquer Online i thought i was needing XNA Studio's. 
Some people told me that it wasn't available since 2014 anymore and wouldn't work on a VS 2017!

With a little bit of Googling i found out that it still is possible to install XNA Studio's on your Computer with Visual Studio 2017

The tutorial down here is from the website i found it at, but to not lose it when that website may be shutdown, i'll post it in the spoiler down here! 
(The needed zip is also attached to this post) 

Spoiler
  1. Download a modified version of MXA Game Studio, which is a set of installers for adding XNA to Visual Studio. files.flatredball.com/content/XnaInstall/XnaForVS2017.zip
  2. After downloading, unzip the XNAForVS2017.zip file
  3. The unzipped folder contains 4 folders. Each one contains an executable. Run them in order:
    1. DirectX\DXSETUP.exe
    2. XNA Framework 4.0 Redistribution\XNA Framework 4.0 Redist.msi
    3. XNA Game Studio 4.0 Platform Tools\XNA Game Studio Platform Tools.msi
    4. XNA Game Studio 4.0 Shared\XNA Game Studio Shared.mxi
  4. Double-click XNA Game Studio 4.0.vsix.
    1. Verify your version of Visual Studio is selected
    2. If you get a message stating “The following extensions are not compatible with Visual Studio 2017”, click Yes– the installation will still work.
  5. Create a new folder: C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\2017\Community\MSBuild\Microsoft\XNA Game Studio
  6. Copy everything or create  symbolic link from
    C:\Program Files (x86)\MSBuild\Microsoft\XNA Game Studio to
    C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\2017\Community\MSBuild\Microsoft\XNA Game Studio
    1. Note that if you are using a different version of Visual Studio you will need to copy the files to the appropriate location. For example, for enterprise, copy the files to C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\2017\Enterprise\MSBuild\Microsoft\XNA Game Studio
    2. Note that if your Visual Studio is installed in a different directory, you will need to copy the files to the Program Files folder on the appropriate directory.
  7. Optional: For TeamCity automated builds, also copy to
    C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\2017\BuildTools\MSBuild\Microsoft\XNA Game Studio
  8. Open the start menu and search for Developer command prompt for VS 2017
  9. Right-click on the result and select “Run as administrator”

    img_5968d629a8021.png.33eedac915e8d633f981abe76335dbc4.png

  10. Execute the following code: (this will add the new version of Microsoft.Build and Microsoft.Build.Framework to the Global Assembly Cache). Note: that you will need to adjust your folder if your Visual Studio is installed on a different directory (such as the D drive).
 
 
 
 
 
MS DOS
 
1
2
3
cd C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\2017\Community\MSBuild\15.0\Bin
gacutil /i Microsoft.Build.Framework.dll
gacutil /i Microsoft.Build.dll

 


Hope this will help some people!

Mugaru

XnaForVS2017.zip

Edited by Mugaru
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What's the point since XNA has been replaced by MonoGame which is essentially the same?

Unless you have legacy reasons then don't use XNA.

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@bauss brings up a good point. XNA is no longer maintained by Microsoft, and hasn't had an update since Visual Studio 2010. MonoGame looks like a nice alternative if you have to use C#, though I'm really not a fan of Mono C#. If you're looking to write a simple 2D game, then you could try Java's Graphics2D class (tutorial). I heard it's quite fun and easy to use for writing simple starter games - a few of my friends wrote games using it in college. Depending on your OS and the version of Java, Graphics2D will also use hardware acceleration via OpenGL or DirectX. Maybe that's something you can test the performance of with a quick game project, before you jump into a map editor (I don't know if you have experience in this already). I can also get a friend of mine to join the board to talk about that, if you're interested. Outside of Java, C# has Unity and a beginner's guide to creating a 2D game. I've heard great things about Unity, and not so great things - so some research is probably necessary to ensure it's the right framework / engine for you. I'd be interested to know where all of this discussion takes you, so keep us informed. Sounds like a fun project.

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7 hours ago, bauss said:

What's the point since XNA has been replaced by MonoGame which is essentially the same?

Unless you have legacy reasons then don't use XNA.

Never heard of MonoGame to be honest! Anyway, it can come handy for some people :) for now i will take a look at MonoGame too! 

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I didn't realize MonoGame was an actual XNA clone that's maintained. And it supports more platforms. That's hilarious!

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13 hours ago, Spirited said:

I didn't realize MonoGame was an actual XNA clone that's maintained. And it supports more platforms. That's hilarious!

Yep, it's the exact reason why you shouldn't use XNA at all.

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